Availability

Qari Rehmat Ullah - Fairy Meadows Cottages

  • Cottage

    Cottage

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    Room facilities:Hot Water, Iron, ironing board in the room, Parking, Porter, Room service

    Cottage

  • Double Hut/Cabin

    Double Hut/Cabin

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    Room facilities:Hot Water, Iron, Parking, Porter

    Double Hut/Cabin

  • Single Cabin/hut

    Single Cabin/hut

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    Room facilities:Hot Water, Iron, Laundry and Dry cleaning, Parking, Porter

    Single Cabin or hut

  • VIP Cottage

    VIP Cottage

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    Room facilities:Hot Water, Iron, Laundry and Dry cleaning, Parking, Porter, Room service

    VIP Cottage

General

At Fairy Meadows Cottages, log cabins are available having the fascinating views of Nanga Parbat. Cottages have a camping site where tourists can pitch their own tents or, they can hire tents. Dining area & kitchen are located adjacent to the camping site. Toilets & baths can be reached very comfortably from cabins & tents. The whole area is demarcated with a controlled access and the tourists are free to enjoy the privacy within the vicinity.

Newly constructed VIP Cottage is available for large group accommodation. The cottage has a central heater and provides excellent view of the Fairy Meadows and Nanga Parbat

Fresh Pakistani and European meals are available in comfortable AZHAR Dining Hall. Local food can also be prepared upon request.

Best time to be there is from March to October. Facilities can be provided in off season as well.

Keeping the nature as well as the basic facilities of life in mind, now Fairy Meadows Cottages facilitates you with Water Turbine generated electricity.

Facilities

  • Hot Water
  • Iron
  • Porter

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Fairy Meadows

Fairy Meadows

Fairy Meadows, named by German climbers (German Märchenwiese, ″fairy tale meadows″) and locally known as Joot, is a grassland near one of the base camp sites of the Nanga Parbat, located in Diamer District, Gilgit-Baltistan. At an altitude of about 3,300 meters above the sea level, it serves as the launching point for trekkers summiting on the Rakhiot face of the Nanga Parbat. In 1995, the Government of Pakistan declared Fairy Meadows a National Park.

Fairy Meadows is approachable by a twelve kilometer-long jeepable trek starting from Raikhot bridge on Karakoram Highway to the village Tato. Further from Tato, it takes about three to four hours hiking by a five kilometer trek to Fairy Meadows. The grassland is located in the Raikhot valley, at one end of the Raikhot glacier which originates from the Nanga Parbat and feeds a stream that finally falls in the River Indus. Since 1992, locals have operated camping sites in the area.

Sports & nature

The six-month tourist season at Fairy Meadows starts in April and continues until the end of September. Tourists lodge at the camping site spread over two acres, known as "Raikot Serai". The site of Fairy Meadows, though partially developed, generates about  17 million revenue from tourism, mainly by providing food, transportation and accommodation services. The grassland is surrounded by thick alpine forest. The high altitude area and north-facing slopes mostly consist of coniferous forest having Pinus wallichiana, Picea smithiana and Abies pindrow trees, while in the high altitude areas with little sunlight are birch and willow dwarf shrubs. The southern slopes are concentrated with juniper and scrubs, namely Juniperus excelsa and J. turkesticana. In the low altitudes, the major plant found is Artemisia, with yellow ash, stone oaks and Pinus gerardiana spread among it. Research has suggested similarities between Pinus wallichiana found in the meadows with a sister species, Pinus peuce, found in the Balkans, based on leaf size. Researchers have found thirty-one species of Rust fungi in the area. Among mammals, a few brown bears are found in the region, with their numbers declining. Some musk deer, regarded as an endangered species, are also present.

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